PG&E Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability Report 2018

PG&E Chapter 11 Update

Customer Energy Efficiency

For more than four decades, PG&E has partnered with our customers to help reduce their energy use through a suite of products and services. Today, our commitment to helping customers save energy is stronger than ever. These programs help keep customer energy bills affordable, maintain energy grid stability and meet California’s clean energy goals.

Our Approach

PG&E’s energy efficiency programs are built on California’s pioneering energy efficiency model, which has helped keep the state’s per capita electricity consumption nearly flat since the 1970s. PG&E’s portfolio is designed to reach all of our customers using a variety of channels, from self-service software tools to PG&E’s business customer account representatives. To increase our impact, we also partner with state and local governments, community partners and third-party energy efficiency specialists.

We also operate two Energy Centers and support a Food Service Training Center, offering energy efficiency education and training programs for building professionals, including architects, designers, engineers, contractors and technicians.

Our energy efficiency priorities include:

  • Working to reduce financial barriers for residential, commercial and government customers.
  • Giving customers access to their data to support smart energy planning.
  • Collaborating with retailers, distributors and others to increase the availability of high-efficiency products.
  • Advocating for stronger building codes and appliance standards.
  • Advancing Zero Net Energy (ZNE) design and technology.
  • Engaging communities through proactive outreach.

2018 Milestones

Highlights from our customer energy efficiency program in 2018 include:

  • Expanded our energy efficiency financing program, which provides commercial customers and government agencies with loans for energy efficiency upgrades with no out-of-pocket costs and zero interest. In 2018, the program funded nearly 800 loans worth a total of $37.6 million. Most loans went to small- and medium-sized businesses, as well as local governments.
  • Supported California’s goal for all newly constructed residential buildings to be ZNE by 2020. To do so, PG&E experts provided technical support for the state’s 2019 building codes, and for adoption of new appliance standards for electric spas and portable air conditioners.
  • Achieved energy savings through energy management technologies and connected homes. PG&E’s Marketplace tool serves customers by providing information about smart thermostats, connected home products and connected applications, which help customers manage their energy use through data provided by PG&E’s Share My Data platform. Nearly 35,000 customers received a rebate in 2018 for adopting a smart thermostat technology.
  • Expanded meter-based energy efficiency programs by capitalizing on investments in smart meters. PG&E launched the Residential Pay-for-Performance program and the Industrial Strategic Energy Management program, which reward energy savings as the savings occur. PG&E expects meter-based savings offerings to continue to expand, further solidifying energy efficiency as a reliable and scalable grid resource.
  • Offered education and training to architects and other building professionals to help them gain new skills and expertise in energy efficient design and construction at our three training centers, holding more than 485 classes, providing over 100 technical consultations, and hosting over 170 outreach events.
  • Continued offering Home Energy Checkups: About 147,000 customers took a Home Energy Checkup in 2018. This program helps customers understand where they use energy and provides personalized saving tips.

Measuring Progress

PG&E’s 2018 energy savings goals, as set by the CPUC, increased dramatically compared to our 2017 goals. PG&E achieved 131 percent of our electric target and 97 percent of our natural gas therms target in 2018.

PG&E fell short of the therms target largely due to the change in the measurement of these programs. Starting with 2018, the programs are measured on a net basis compared to the prior years’ reporting, which was on a gross basis. (Net savings excludes savings that would have been achieved in the absence of the energy efficiency programs.)

Annual Energy Savings Footnote 1 from Customer Energy Efficiency Programs
2016 (gross) 2017 (gross) 2018 (gross) Footnote 2a 2018 (net) Footnote 2b
Megawatts (peak) 292 320 358.2 342.7
Gigawatt Hours (total) 1,406 1,487 1,370 1,288
Million Therms 24 33 33.2 30
  • 1. Annual energy savings refer to the first-year impacts associated with installed customer energy efficiency projects. All data is as filed with the CPUC in Pacific Gas and Electric Company’s Energy Efficiency Program Portfolio Reports. Annual energy savings include savings from codes and standards programs.1
  • 2. Until 2017, Customer Energy Efficiency savings were calculated on a gross basis. In 2018, the CPUC began calculating energy savings on a net basis, which excludes savings that would have been achieved in the absence of energy efficiency programs.2a, 2b
Annual Avoided Emissions Footnote 1 from Customer Energy Efficiency Programs
2016 (gross) 2017 (gross) 2018 (gross) Footnote 2a 2018 (net) Footnote 2b
CO2 Avoided (metric tons) 1,429,543 802,034 556,986 284,658
NOX Avoided (tons) 296 230 341 191
  • 1. Annual avoided emissions refer to the first-year impacts associated with installed customer energy efficiency projects. All data is as filed with the CPUC in Pacific Gas and Electric Company’s Energy Efficiency Program Portfolio Reports.1
  • 2. Until 2017, Customer Energy Efficiency savings were calculated on a gross basis. In 2018, the CPUC began calculating energy savings on a net basis, which excludes savings that would have been achieved in the absence of energy efficiency programs.2a, 2b